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Columbia, MD 21046

P. 410-290-0707

 

 

Baltimore, MD 21202

P. 410-962-1199

Non-competes for low wage earners void

On October 1, 2019, a new law will take effect which codifies what many Maryland courts have generally held regarding blanket non-compete provisions for all employees.    Under the new law any non-compete agreement that restricts the ability of an employee who earns less than Fifteen Dollars ($15.00) per hour or Thirty-One Thousand Two Hundred Dollars ($31,200) annually, to work in the same or similar business or trade shall be deemed null and void.  The legislature determined that such agreements are against public policy.  This new law does not prevent employers from entering into contracts with employees that restrict them from taking and using the employer’s proprietary information, including client lists, nor does it affect employees who earn more than Fifteen Dollars ($15.00) per hour or Thirty-One Thousand Two Hundred Dollars ($31,200) annually. 

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Non-competes for low wage earners void
Under a new Maryland law any non-compete agreement that restricts the ability of an employee who earns less than $15.00 per hour or $31,200)annually, to work in the same or similar business or trade shall be deemed null and void
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